Maastricht UMC +

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The University of Maastricht (UM) and the University Medical Center Maastricht (azM) work together under the umbrella organisation Maastricht UMC+, or Maastricht University Medical Center+. Maastricht UMC+ with a focus on health recovery, health preservation and health promotion. Quality, safety and patient focus are given our highest priority. Maastricht UMC+ has three mutually reinforcing core tasks:  Patient care: We provide diagnostics and treatment, from basic care to top clinical and top  referral care to the most complex patients;  Research: We undertake  scientific research, from fundamental to applied, that complements and contributes to the specializations within patient health care;  Education and Training: We train new generations of doctors and researchers. In addition to these three core tasks, we realize that creating value from knowledge is becoming increasingly important.  Of the eight Dutch university medical centers, the Maastricht UMC+ is the only one that is both a teaching and general hospital. This enables us to quickly implement research results into our patient care and use them for care improvement and innovation. Our service area as an academic healthcare institution stretches from South Limburg to South-East Brabant. MUMC+ is the major health care provider in the Limburg and Brabant area in the Netherlands. The Comprehensive Cancer Center Maastricht (CCCM), of MUMC+ offers not only state-of-the-art treatment to cancer patients but is also leading the Comprehensive Cancer Center Maastricht (CCCM), which links the oncology units of the Limburg and Brabant area of the Netherlands to MUMC+. CCCM standardizes and optimizes the medical care of the cancer patients, develops and participates in multicentre clinical trials and is also involved in translational research. CCCM is also highly active in postgraduate training. Our Clinical Trial Unit offers a full range of services in phase I, II and III clinical trials.  The department of Radiation Oncology of MUMC+ has far-reaching expertise in phase I, II and III clinical trials. Our department has a state-of-the-art Phase I unit, treatment modalities and a fully equipped infrastructure for proper staging and treatment monitoring. We have extensive expertise in running clinical trials.

DTU

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The Technical University of Denmark is ranked as one of the foremost technical universities in Europe, DTU is focused on approaching areas of medical biology with a strong technology emphasis. With the vision that new technologies are required to reveal the pathogenic mysteries behind yet untreatable diseases. DTU offers a strong technical environment and good administrative support, essential for the research output. DTU vet, is a section for Immunology and Vaccinology and has specific focus on Immunology related to both human and veterinary health.    The group of Sine Reker Hadrup is a leader in multiplex detection of antigen specific T-cells by use of peptide-MHC based reagents. We have developed a next-generation detection technology for multi-parallel detection of antigen responsive T cells in infectious diseases and cancer, using DNA-labelled MHC multimers (manuscript currently under review in Nature Biotechnology). We are playing a major role in providing understanding of T cell recognition of cancer, and how antigen recognition can be translated into targeted immune therapies in cancer diseases. We are focused on development of new technologies and constantly strive to expand our platform to reach maximal complexity in T-cell detection, and combining the mapping of T-cell specificity with complex phenotypic and functional analyses. We have previously shown that the above-mentioned platform is feasible for detection and mapping of tumour-associated responses. As such we have used this technology to describe the T-cell recognition in NSCLC (McGranaham, Science 2016), Melanoma (Andersen/Hadrup, Cancer Research 2009) and Merkel Cell Carcinoma.  We have expertise in mapping of mutation-derived neoepitopes based on personalized tumour mutations predicted from RNA and DNA sequencing of tumour material.in several cancer diseases. We have a high-throughput platform for generation of peptide-MHC complexes for approx. 50 different HLA class I alleles. Furthermore, we have a strong expertise in flow cytometry in general, and the detection and description of various immune-cell populations.  SR Hadrup is a long-term member, and current chair of the Immunoguiding programme of the European Cancer Immune therapy organization (CIMT).  The group of Zoltan Szallasi and Aron Eklund develops and applies cutting-edge computational methods for analysis and interpretation of genomic and genome-scale measurements of tumor specimens, with an overall aim to improve cancer patient outcomes by enabling improved treatment decisions and revealing new therapeutic opportunities. They have identified several DNA aberrations patterns that predict response to specific genotoxic therapeutic agents, some of which are currently undergoing extensive clinical validation. They have also been investigating next generation sequencing data in order to identify MHC/oncogenic neoantigen combinations that elicit effective antitumor immune response.

KU Leuven

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The Leuven Lung Cancer Group (LLCG) is a world- wide recognised high-quality clinical and experimental hub in which innovative diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer was pioneered. The group has published over 500 scientific papers, including practice-changing work in diagnosis and treatment, some published in top-journals such as the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Chest, Lancet and The New England Journal of Medicine. The LLCG includes specialists in pulmonology, respiratory oncology, surgery, nuclear medicine, radiology, radiation oncology, pathology and rehabilitation. The group includes specialists in pulmonology, Prof Johan Vansteenkiste, Prof Christophe Dooms and Prof Kristiaan Nackaerts, in surgery, Prof Paul De Leyn and Dr Herbert Decaluwe, in nuclear medicine Prof Christophe Dooms, for radiology Prof Walter De Wever, for pathology Prof Eric Verbeken and Prof Thierry Troosters for rehabilitation. This includes molecular imaging with PET scans, invasive and non-invasive diagnosis, and novel systemic therapies. The latter includes trials with chemotherapy and targeted agents, but also with vaccination against lung cancer and immunotherapy as well. This research group has great expertise in the identification of biomarkers in blood and tissue samples of patients, due to the participation in many in house and (inter)national clinical trials (e.g. EORTC) with embedded translational research. There is thus a proven track record available for translational and multidisciplinary clinical research in lung cancer.

UCSC

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The Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore  is the most comprehensive and complete legally recognized university in Italy: it includes five campuses (Milano, Brescia, Piacenza-Cremona, Roma and Campobasso) The “Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore” with its Gemelli Advanced Radiation Therapy (Gemelli-ART) participates to the projects through the application of high quality technology and technique in realization of high conformal and accurate radiotherapy treatments and moreover the consolidated clinical experience in administration of chemotherapy and biological drugs. The Gemelli-ART has the experience, the expertise and the resources adequate to provide a high qualified contribution to the project. In particular, the Gemelli-ART is a high volume treatments Unit with a consolidate quality assurance program. A complete cancer stadiation is guaranteed by the presence of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Department, allowing a high quality morphological (CT and MRI) and molecular imaging (Body Scan and PET-CT). The Radiation Therapy Unit organizes weekly multidisciplinary tumour board, to share a personalized therapeutic strategy. 
The Radiotherapy Unit is used to treat many different forms of cancer, and it is equipped to deliver a large range of techniques (IMRT, IGRT, SBRT, SRS, SABR, BT, IORT, TSI, TBI) for every tumour regions and with various fractionation schedule. The new technologies allow high precision radiotherapy treatments in order to improve clinical outcomes and reduce toxicities. In particular, there is an on-going development in new technologies that it will increase hypofractionation treatments (SRS, SBRT, SABR) delivered by high precision techniques as Intensity Modulated therapy or volumetric arc therapy. In addition, there is the possibility to manage chemotherapy and biological drugs, in neoadjuvant, and adjuvant settings, concurrent or not with radiation therapy. 
The Radiotherapy Unit is involved in many clinical trials. The clinical service is enhanced by a strong research programme also with recent implementation of Knowledge Based Oncology Labs (KBO Labs) for data mining and radiomics to develop predicitve models. A innovative information technology architecture called “BOA” (Beyond Ontology Awareness), has been developed for standardize data collection, to convert (legacy) archives of a center using a global data dictionary and replicates anonymously the clinical data into a cloud based large database. The KBO Labs provides another stage of the system, evolving toward a distributed learning approach. The KBO Labs has been involved in the development of predictive models or in the analysis of imaging features in the rectal and lung cancer and is currently involved in several clinical trials about standardize data collection: SAGE project (Medical data mining platform and Data Quality Assurance); VATE project (VAlidation of high TEchnology based on large database analysis by learning machine); INFRARED project (Development of predictive models and facilitation the publication of papers addressed to support evidences promoting the implementation of MRI IGRT technology-ViewRayTM in radiotherapy); PREMISE project (standardize data collection in patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy); PROMETHEO project (PRediction models in Oral and PHaryngolaryngeal cancers for anti-EGFR based Therapy); COBRA project (standardize data collection in patients treated with brachytherapy). 

NKI-AVL

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The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL) is an integrated comprehensive cancer centre, combining a hospital and research laboratories in one independent organisation. The hospital accommodates 180 beds, including in-patient units for combined modality treatments and pharmacokinetics, a large Radiotherapy department and outpatient clinics. The laboratory covers all major areas of cancer research and includes many programs translating basic research findings into improved clinical cancer prevention, diagnosis and therapy. Basic researchers focus on molecular events that direct cell division, survival, differentiation and migration. Cell biologists are supported by excellent core facilities. The preclinical activities are clustered in the recently established Mouse Cancer Clinic: a large facility for maintenance of mouse strains with expert biotechnical staff and up-to-date equipment, including bioluminescence cameras, SPECT-CT, MRI imaging and an image-guided micro beam mouse irradiator (www.nki.nl).    The research activities of the Division of Radiotherapy are clustered around three themes: (1) improving treatment accuracy, (2) enhancing radiation response by dose escalation, chemoradiation and biological response modifiers, and (3) predicting treatment outcome and prognosis by genetic profiling, functional imaging and biomarkers. The following areas of expertise are relevant to this project:  Clinical Research. This program covers all major tumor sites and focuses on improved delineation, planning, delivery and verification techniques (Stereotactic IGRT for lung cancer; Probability based treatment planning; High precision IGRT; Adaptive radiotherapy strategies; (Preoperative) Hypofractionated radiotherapy. 

Universitair Ziekenhuis Gent

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UZ Gent is one of the largest and most specialized hospitals in Flanders, delivering a full range of highly specialized, high-quality care. As a university center UZ Gent is also investing in scientific research and education, for which it operates in close collaboration with the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the Ghent University. Set in this environment, the Radiation Oncology Department of the University Hospital in Ghent is an academic radiotherapy department with a focus on radiation technology development. It pioneered the introduction of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in Belgium and beyond. Its research focus now has shifted towards other novel radiotherapy technologies such as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), adaptive radiotherapy (ART) and dose-painting. Through collaboration with the Lab for Experimental Cancer Research, a specific interest exists for the mechanisms of metastatic tumour development and progression, hence the emphasis on developing new treatment modalities for oligometastatic disease. Operating on 4 linear accelerators and with a staff of 11 radiation oncologists and 10 physicists (part of which have a major research activity), it delivers about 1800 new radiation treatments a year. Of these, about one out of four are enrolled in clinical trials.    The Radiation Oncology’s expertise in new radiotherapy technology can only foster by close collaboration with other groups. For lung cancer, the close collaboration with the Thoracic Oncologists is embedded in the LONG (Long Oncologisch Netwerk Gent) tumor working group. The Thoracic Oncology team of the Dept. Pulmonary Medicine strives to provide the highest quality in diagnostics, functional evaluation, systemic treatment and best supportive care for thoracic malignancies. The department can rely on a well-staffed trial management bureau comprising data managers with extensive experience in academic and industry-sponsored clinical trials in thoracic oncology, from phase 1 to phase 3. The team is also expanding its fundamental and research activities in immuno-oncology through the recently established Tumor Immunology Laboratory, and the initiation and promotion of the Immuno-Oncological Network Ghent.

The Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc

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The Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc (CUSL - UCL) is one of the main academic hospitals of Brussels, and is currently treating the largest number of cancer patients in this region. CUSL has 3 main priorities: high quality care, education, and research in fundamental, translational and clinical fields.  In this spirit, the radiotherapy department of the CUSL has been focusing for many years on the development, implementation and validation of novel radiotherapy technologies, including tumour motion management strategies, image-guided radiation therapy, dose painting with molecular imaging and Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy. Two out of the 5 radiation oncologists are half-time research, and supervise 4 PhD students in the field of image-guidance and high precision radiation delivery techniques. Amongst the on-going research projects, we are currently leading 3 phase II trials on SABR in liver and lung primary tumours.  The multidisciplinary team in charge of lung cancer patients (GOTH) consists of 14 medical and paramedical experts who collaborate to cover all aspects of patient management, from diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. Besides providing the highest quality of care, this team also participates to 11 academic and industry-sponsored phase I-to-3 clinical trials, of which 2 are related to SABR in early stage NSCLC, and 4 to immunotherapy in advanced stage NSCLC. All studies are coordinated by 2 dedicated data managers experienced in lung cancers.

Centre Oscar Lambret

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Centre Oscar Lambret (COL) is a regional center in northern france (Lille) dedicated to the fight against cancer. They offer specialist care, teaching and research in oncology. 
In collaboration with industries or academic institutions, the radiotherapy department of Centre Oscar Lambret has managed more than 20 national and international cancer clinical trials with more than 10 in the field of new target drugs. 

Universitaets Klinikum Tuebingen

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We are an academic tertiary care center treating 2500 new cancer patients per year (>45000 fractions). Our clinical and scientific expertise include a broad spectrum of modern cancer therapy including imaging and high-precision radiotherapy. Our department is partner of the CCC with its Lung Center and the Translational Unit Immunotherapy. A total of 4 Linacs with IMRT/IGRT equipment, 12 board certified radiation oncologists including three specialised in lung cancer, 30 RTTs and a trial unit with coordiantors and nurses are available. The department has 40 beds for in- patients and a day clinic for outpatient chemotherapy. 
The CCC treats 10000 patients (6500 newly diagnosed) per year. About 500 patients with lung cancer are treated at the CCC Tübingen. About 60-65 patients with NSCLC are treated in the Radiation Oncology Department per year. We participate in phase 1 to 3 trials and recruit about 250 patients per year in trial protocols. We have participated or will soon be initiated in 4 prospective multicentre trials in NSCLC. We currently have a phase 1 trial with immunotherapy in NSCLC and glioma running. 

University College Hospital

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University College London Cancer Institute and the University College Hospital form a leading UK Comprehensive Cancer Centre, combining basic cancer biology and translational research with delivering excellent cancer care. The research proposed within this application will be provided through the Radiotherapy Department and the Clinical Research Facility with support from the UCL Cancer Institute. It was awarded status of CRUK UCL-Manchester Lung Centre of Excellence in 2014 
The Radiotherapy department is situated in the basement of University College London Hospital. The Department treats approximately 1800 patients a year. The equipment consists of: 5 Varian Linear Accelerators (Linacs), 4 of which have volumetric arc therapy facility, 4 with on-board imaging facilities and all with MLC’s and Portal Imaging, CT Simulator with Advantage Sim software, Orthovoltage treatment unit, HDR Brachytherapy theatre. UCLH offers stereotactic radiotherapy for cranial malignancies and early primary thoracic malignancies and is currently extending this technique to the management of oligometastastic disease at other sites. We have a working partnership with HCA having shared use of TrueBeam Linear Accelerator. UCLH was selected to host one of two Proton Beam Facilities in the UK and is planned to be clinically functional by 2018. 
The NIHR/Wellcome Clinical Research Facility is a state-of-the-art early phase trials unit dedicated to cancer drug development. Located on the ground floor of the University College Hospital, the unit provides twenty treatment spaces, clinic rooms, a pharmacy dispensary and a GCLP sample handling laboratory. A broad portfolio of academic and commercially sponsored early phase clinical trials are undertaken by specialist clinical staff, including first-in-man as well as tumour specific phase I and II trials. 
University College London (UCL) is one of the world’s leading universities and is renowned for its outstanding research and teaching. The university won the largest funding allocation from UK research councils in 2013. The UCL Cancer Institute is the hub for cancer research at UCL. The Institute is structured as five Departments (Oncology, Haematology, Pathology, Cancer Biology and the CR-UK UCL Clinical Trials Centre). It has a GCLP facility which contains a large assay lab for pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamics studies, a lab for handling radioactive trial samples, a separate PCR lab, a monitored sample storage area, a microscope room and a clinical sample-handling lab which is linked to the Clinical Research Facility. 
 
There is considerable expertise in early phase trials in the Clinical Research Facility with experience in first-in-man and phase Ib/II studies. Dr Forster has a particular interest in the translation of the increased understanding of cancer biology into clinical studies and is leading on phase I academic studies including ORCA (Olaparib with concurrent chemoradiation for poor prognostic head and neck cancer patients) and PATRIOT (first-in-man study of AZ 6738 as single agent and in combination with palliative radio 

Technische Universität Dresden

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OncoRay is an interdisciplinary research center established in 2005 and financed by the Technische Universität Dresden, the University Hospital Dresden and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden- Rossendorf. OncoRay together with its sister institution HIRO Heidelberg has been nominated as National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. It is located at the campus of the medical faculty in the heart of Dresden. OncoRay's vision is to improve the treatment of cancer by means of biologically individualized, technically optimized radiotherapy. Focus and strategy are aimed at preclinical and clinical translational research.  Approximately 20% of all patients are included in clinical trials approved by an ethical committee and managed by our GCP compliant Data Centre. Translational research is one of our strengths and has resulted in the currently accrual of an industry-sponsored phase I clinical study. Between 2006 and 2013, the phase II IIT-study on FMISO-PET imaging has successfully been conducted and will be followed by a randomized image-guided dose-escalation study in advanced stage, HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients. Finally, physics-related research, with particular emphasis on proton beam therapy, has gained international attention, e.g., prompt gamma imaging and timing. The Department of Radiation Oncology in Dresden offers state-of-the-art radiotherapy to more than 2500 cancer patients each year. It is equipped with a PET-CT and a PET-MR scanner besides CT scanners on all photon and proton beam accelerators.  https://tu-dresden.de/med/mf

Radboudumc

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Radboud university medical center is a leading academic center for patient care, education and research, with the mission ‘to have a significant impact on healthcare’. Our activities help to improve healthcare and consequently the health of individuals and of society. We believe we can achieve that by providing excellent quality, participatory and personalized healthcare, operational excellence and by working together in sustainable networks. 
Excellent quality 
Patients deserve the best possible care. This is why we aim to deliver excellent quality that has to be proven. From patient care to the most prestigious research programs 
Participatory and personalized healthcare 
The best care for patients in general is not necessarily the best care for individuals. We develop our healthcare around patients; each of whom is seen as a member of the treatment team. Personalised healthcare means that whenever possible we match diagnostics and therapies to the specific characteristics and needs of the patient 
Operational excellence 
Operational excellence is a consequence of performing our jobs well through proper research, education and patient care. We ask ourselves daily if the job we do can be done better 
Sustainable networks 
We work with regional, national and international partners. Patients receive the best possible care where ever their needs can be best met. 
In our department of Radiation Oncology, several research projects investigating the effect of tumor cell hypoxia with radiotherapy are running. The research has a strong translational character and is directed towards Head and Neck Cancer, Non Small Cell Lung Cancer and breast cancer. Current topics are focused on: analyzing EGFR signaling related to radiation resistance (PI3-K/AKT pathway related to tumor vasculature, proliferation and hypoxia involvement); non-invasive imaging of the tumor microenvironment (vasculature, hypoxia, proliferation and the EGFR) and assessment of endogenous markers related to tumor cell metabolism. Also, more recently we intensified our research directed towards oligometastatic disease, currently we coordinate a national study investigating stereotactic radiotherapy versus conventional radiotherapy for metastases of the spine. Our University has a long standing expertise in research related to basic immunological processes and the development of immunotherapy for cancer. Recently the group of prof dr G. Adema has joined our Radiation Oncology department. His work focuses on the development of new immune based combination therapies for cancer. 

Philogen S.p.A

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Philogen (http://www.philogen.com/) was founded in 1996 with the mission to develop new bio- pharmaceuticals for the treatment of angiogenesis-related disorders, such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and endometriosis. The company has been a pioneer in the isolation, engineering and clinical development of lead products capable of targeting angiogenesis in vivo and has been the first in the world to demonstrate that human monoclonal antibodies, specific for a marker of angiogenesis, can efficiently and selectively target the neo-vasculature in patients with cancer or with rheumatoid arthritis.    At present, the company has four promising anti-cancer antibody derivatives and one antibody- derivative for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in >10 international clinical studies. Two registrational clinical trials are about to be launched. Philogen generates revenues from a diversified range of activities, has signed agreements with major pharmaceutical companies, has been granted over 100 valid national patents worldwide, and is cash-flow positive since 1999.  Because of its extensive (and well documented) track record in taking lead products from the lab to Phase I / II clinical trials, Philogen is perfectly fit to accomplish the tasks required by the IMMUNOSABR project. Philogen staff is expert in the GMP production of immunocytokines, in the preparation and submission of dossier to competent authorities and in the management of clinical trials according to GCP. 

Health Innovation Ventures B.V.

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Health Innovation Ventures B.V. aims to revolutionise healthcare through several approaches. Specifically, two departments of Health Innovation V entures will be involved in the IMMUNOSABR project: OncoRadiomics department (HIV/OR): “Revolutionizing Precision Medicine with Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers” is what OncoRadiomics stands for. OncoRadiomics is a spin-off of Maastro Clinic and Maastricht University Medical Center, which will achieve more effective, individualized screening & therapy for cancer patients thanks to quantitative imaging. RADIOMICS is the main product, an innovative imaging analysis software solution that enables the extraction of unique quantitative features (and associated Radiomic signatures) from standard images to guide personalized cancer treatment (see animation: https://youtu.be/Tq980GEVP0Y). OncoRadiomics aims to bring Radiomics technology to the market, and ultimately to the clinic by means of certified solutions. The ambition of OncoRadiomics is to ensure that Radiomics becomes a first line diagnostic tool for tumor phenotyping and for clinical decision making. This way, Radiomics can be used in a clinical setting for, e.g., treatment response prediction, early identification patients responding to treatment, or identification of effective drugs in an early stage.  e-Learning4Health department (HIV/EL4H): e-Learning4Health develops e-Learning solutions for patients and professionals in the healthcare sector. These approaches are meant to be implemented in the clinical practice and enhance the way patients and health care professionals communicate, interact and learn. 

ptTheragnostic B.V.

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ptTheragnostic is a spin-off company of Maastro Clinic (MC) and Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC) which will achieve more effective, individualised oncological therapy for cancer patients. ptTheragnostic is initially based on the mitochondrial DNA assay, MitoTx™, to predict the risk for radiation-induced toxicity in patients that undergo oncological treatment. The company incorporated a second asset, PRODECIS™, which is a clinical decision support system to select the right patients for individualised oncological treatment. With these two assets the company has improved its positioning and increased the likelihood of attracting funding. Taken together, ptTheragnostic is the service company for patient stratification for personalised oncology. 
“Patient stratification for personalised oncology”.That is what we at ptTheragnostic stand for. Healthcare has become more challenging and expensive throughout the years. Finding the right treatment for the right patient is essential to continue the delivery of high-quality, individualised healthcare. ptTheragnostic has three core proprietary technology platforms to enable this:
MitoTx: genetic test to predict complication risk  PRODECIS: decision support for proton therapy  PREDICTapps: apps for tablets & smartphones    Know-how, expertise and tools for the development of biomarkers.  A broad network and support team of business developers with proven track record 

European Cancer Patient Coalition

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Established in 2003, the European Cancer Patient Coalition is a European umbrella non- governmental organisation, uniquely representing the interests of all cancer patient groups from the most common to the rare forms of cancer. It was set up:  −  to represent the views of cancer patients in the European healthcare debate;  −  to enable and empower cancer patients by educating them about cancer and advocacy skills;  −  to provide a forum for European cancer patients to exchange information and share concerns  on cancer care policies in their countries and best practice experiences. ECPC membership comprises 394 member organisations in 46 countries.  ECPC mission and tasks:  −  Make cancer a priority for action on the European health policy agenda;  −  Contribute to change policies and legislations to achieve our vision;  −  Ensuring that all cancer patients in the EU have timely and appropriate access to early  detection and intervention measures, information regarding on-going clinical trials, state-of-  the-art treatment and care.  −  Ensure that state-of-the-art cancer care practice is shared across the EU and disparities in  cancer care within and between Member States are eradicated.  −  Empower cancer patients to take an active role in shaping national healthcare policy that  impacts on cancer prevention, treatment and care  −  Foster co-operation between cancer patients’ organisations within Europe;Acknowledge the growing number of cancer survivors and advocate for better survivors healthcare services and enhanced social services aimed at total rehabilitation of survivors.      ECPC demonstrated a vast interest into the promises of immuno-oncology. For this reason, ECPC, together with the scientific community (ESMO, CIMT, ECCO), academia and industry, established in 2014 an informal European expert group which drafted guidelines for the further development of immuno-oncology in Europe. In November 2014, ECPC launched two important documents authored by the expert group with an event at the European Parliament (Immuno-oncology: a policy action framework and What is immuno-oncology: a guide for patients). The guide for patients has been translated in 20 languages to this day.  In November 2015, ECPC launched the ECPC Immuno-Oncology Portal (IOP) at an event at the European Parliament. The IOP represents Europe’s first patient-led, scientifically validated online learning platform on cancer immunotherapy and immuno-oncology. The Portal aims to offer European cancer patients clear information to help them understand how cancer immunotherapies work, and what role immunotherapy and immuno-oncology treatments may play in treating their cancer. One e-learning module is fully developed, and a second one will be available in spring 2016. 

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